Boza: A Traditional Fermented Drink

Bu yazının Türkçesini burada bulabilirsiniz: Evde Boza

We continue our blog with a post about fermented beverages, this article is about Boza. Boza is a traditional Anatolia originated drink produced from different cereals. Some people love it while some others don’t. I love it a lot, especially if it is a little bit sour. The sweet one is kind of milky desert, which I do not prefer.

Whenever we are in Turkey, it is not a problem to find it. However, as we currently live abroad, we do not have a chance to find it. One day, I searched for a recipe so that I can prepare at home. There are lots of articles about its microbial content and benefits. Still, I could not find a proper recipe in food/cooking related web-sites. I kept searching and then I got lucky. I finally reached to a proper recipe with all its detail given by a Turkish man who lives in Canada.

First of all, we bought millet from supermarket; we already had bulgur wheat, rice and flour at home. Then, we incubated our baker yeast in a bowl containing bread pieces at room temperature (it took four days to make it sour). Then, we started to boil the cereals. I followed the recipe given, which was very helpful. I broiled the flour before adding to the mixture- I loved this step very much as the kitchen smelled wonderful after this step. Differently from the recipe, we homogenised the boiled mixture in a blender to filter easily. We added the sugar at the end of third day. In fourth day, the taste became desirable. We transferred the boza to a glass jar and a pitcher and put in the fridge. Next day, we consumed it with lots of cinnamon; the taste was wonderful as I dreamt. We used the remaining sour yeast to bake some bread. If you would like to try something different, it is just the time as winter is already here.

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If you would like to try the recipe you can find it from this link (in Turkish) or below:
https://eksisozluk.com/boza–32267?p=11.

Ingredients:
Millet (they are looking like small yellow balls), bulgur wheat, rice, flour, baker yeast, sugar.

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How to make it:
• Cut the breads into very small pieces and put in a bowl containing water. Add some dry baker yeast with a teaspoon. Incubate it at room temperature 4 to 5 days. Add some water if it is needed (do not let it dry). At the end of the 4th or 5th day the mixture will be totally sour.
• Put about 200 g millet, 50 g bulgur wheat and 50 g rice in a casserole and add about two litres of water. Then boil it for 1h, mix it frequently. Later, homogenise the mixture with a blender.
• The filter it through a strainer by the help of a spoon. The filtrate will be transferred into a glass jar.
• Two table spoons of plain flour will be broiled in a pan without adding anything. It will turn brown. Then add it into the jar and mix. The mixture should have a viscosity/density similar to honey. If it is needed add some boiled water and mix it.
• Wait until the temperature of the mixture is about 45C. Then, add the yeast using a filter.
• Add one glass of sugar, mix then put in place warm in your kitchen.
• 2-3 days later, sweet taste will be converted into sour (due to the production of organic acids and alcohol).
• In order to have a stronger taste and more alcohol content, add one glass of sugar again on third day. The yeasts will be already grown very-well so one more day will be enough for yeasts to consume the sugar. On 4th day your boza is ready to serve. Enjoy ☺